Forthcoming Conferences of Interest

55TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES – CANCELLED

The 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies scheduled for 7-10 May 2020 at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo has been cancelled.

THE RECEPTION OF PLATO IN LATER ANTIQUITY AND THE MIDDLE AGES

We are delighted to announce a 2-day conference, organized by the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in collaboration with the Australian Research Council and Macquarie University, Australia The conference will take place at the University of Athens, 8-9 June 2020. We have collaborated with the ISNS conference organisers so to facilitate the participation of local and international delegates to both events, but please note that the two events are run independently. News about our conference can be found on https://evanagno.wixsite.com/platoreception Our Approach: Taking start from our common interest in the Platonic tradition and its reception in later periods, our collaboration has to date yielded one edited volume (The Neoplatonists and their Heirs, Brill, 2020, ed. Ken Parry and E. Anagnostou-Laoutides), while a second one is anticipated to host select papers from the conference. We now wish to expand our network of co-thinkers and thus, we welcome papers on any aspect of Platonic reception, both in the Byzantine East and the Latin West, in philosophical, literary and/or theological texts. Confirmed Speakers include (in alphabetical order): -Prof Dirk Baltzly (University of Tasmania) -Prof Kevin Corrigan (Emory University) -Prof Lloyd Gerson (Toronto University) -Prof Ilaria Ramelli (Durham University/ “Angelicum” University/ Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan) Please send abstracts of circa 300 words to the conference organisers by 15 December 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by 15th January 2020. Our emails are: Eva.Anagnostou-Laoutides@mq.edu.au; G.Steiris@ppp.uoa.gr; garabatz@ppp.uoa.gr We look forward to receiving your contributions, Sincerely, Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides (MQ) – George Steiris (UoA)– George Arabatzis (UoA)

THE SPATIAL TURN IN ROMAN STUDIES

Durham, June 10-12 2020 Organised by Amy Russell and Maxine Lewis https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-spatial-turn-roman-studies We announce two international conferences plus a year-long programme of events in Durham on the theme ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies’. We plan a series of events reflecting on a generation’s worth of work on the spatial turn in Roman studies and seeking out the best new scholarship arising from it. The goal of our programme of events is a double one: first, to gain an overview of the directions research has taken, identify underlying themes and trends, and describe successful spatial methodology as a guideline for future work; second, to move beyond what has been done and explore the full potential of spatial approaches, especially by bringing together work that has taken the same body of spatial theory in different directions. The most pressing divide we see is between work on historical and archaeological space on the one hand, and imagined and literary space on the other: they represent two well-developed bodies of scholarship in Roman studies, both often drawing on the same set of 20th-century spatial theory, but not often in conversation with each other. We seek to address the questions: could more be done to bring them together and pool their insights, or does the problem lie in the way the underlying spatial theories fail to bring together real and imagined space? The Auckland conference will include research papers, seminars with pre-circulated readings from major thinkers in spatial theory, and keynote addresses from Ray Laurence, Nandini Pandey, and Diana Spencer. This call is for those interested in delivering 20-minute research papers on any topic related to the spatial turn in Roman studies. Papers should present new research grounded in spatial methodologies; they could be historical, literary, archaeological, philosophical, or all four and more, and could cover any aspect of the Roman Mediterranean from the archaic period to late antiquity, but should reflect the impact of the spatial turn on their scholarly context. Please send a 300-word abstract as an email attachment to BOTH amy.russell@dur.ac.uk AND maxine.lewis@auckland.ac.nz by 28 June 2019, with the subject header ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies: Auckland’. We welcome proposals for innovative presentation formats, and are keen to hear from speakers of all career stages and from any discipline. It is our ambition to pay for flights within Australasia and accommodation during the conference period for all speakers. Please note that the conference for the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will be held in Otago, New Zealand, the following week. If speakers are flying from outside Australasia to attend both our conference and ASCS, we aim to pay for your transport between Auckland and Otago. Prospective speakers from the northern hemisphere should consider waiting to apply to the Durham conference, to reduce the total amount of air travel required. We hope to support virtual attendance for some sessions via Skype or similar, but those giving papers should plan to attend in person.

WRITING ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SAME-SEX DESIRE: GOALS, METHODS, CHALLENGES

This call for papers is for a conference to take place June 30-July 2, 2020 at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on the topic of writing about same-sex desire in ancient and medieval societies. See https://cms.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/events/writing-ancient-and-medieval-same-sex-desire-goals,-methods,-challenges for more. Derek Krueger (UNC Greensboro), Mark Masterson (Victoria University of Wellington), Nancy Rabinowitz (Hamilton College), and Shaun Tougher (Cardiff University) will be providing  plenary addresses. For several decades now, scholars have devoted attention to same-sex desire in both ancient times and the centuries that followed. Not surprisingly, there have been vigorous debates over how to go about it. These debates have been framed in various ways. Here are some examples:

  • essentialism VERSUS constructivism;
  • Foucauldian discourse analysis VERSUS approaches inspired by psychoanalysis;
  • (the impossibility of) objective history VERSUS (overly) subjective history;
  • perception of commonalities across time VERSUS rigorously historicizing insistence on the past’s alterity;
  • positivism VERSUS imaginative reconstruction of contemporaneous receptions.

These dichotomies, which are both reductive and don’t exhaust the possibilities, continue to crackle with contention. They also continue to undergird and even disturb current scholarly endeavours. We are looking for papers (30 minutes in length) in which scholars not only speak about primary source material but also reflect explicitly on the theoretical orientation of their work (see the dichotomies above for examples) and the purpose(s) of (their) scholarship on same-sex desire. An additional objective of this conference will be an edited volume of papers that will aim to showcase a variety of approaches to this important topic. Please send proposals (c. 500 words) to Mark Masterson (writingsamesexdesire@gmail.com) by 1 December 2019. If you have any questions, please send them to him at this address also. In your proposal include:

  • the primary source material/historical milieu to be discussed, and
  • the general theoretical basis of the work

This conference is underwritten by the Marsden Fund/Te Pūtea Rangahau A Marsden of the Royal Society/Te Apārangi of New Zealand. Dr. Mark Masterson Senior Lecturer of Classics Marsden Fund Researcher (2018-2020) on desire between Byzantine men Author of Man to Man (Ohio 2014) Classics Programme Victoria University of Wellington 600 Kelburn Parade Wellington, New Zealand 6140 Phone: 64 4 463 6909 Email: Mark.Masterson@vuw.ac.nz Location: OLD KIRK 514 Web: http://en.gravatar.com/kiwimark

INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS 2020 – CANCELLED

Conference Web Site

The twenty-sixth International Medieval Congress scheduled to take place in Leeds from 6-9 July 2020 has been cancelled.

CONFLICTS AND CATASTROPHES IN ROMAN AND LATE ANTIQUE THRACE

Fourth International Conference “Roman and Late Antique Thrace” (RaLATh), 12–16 October 2020, Burgas, Bulgaria

Strategically located and rather vulnerable at the same time, ancient Thrace experienced a fairly large number of turbulent episodes throughout its existence. Several unsettling events, ranging from man-made conflicts to natural disasters, have disrupted the usual rhythm of civic life and have left their imprint on historical record. The Fourth RaLATh Conference seeks to explore these processes by inviting scholars from various academic backgrounds. Relevant contributions will focus on different aspects of conflicts and catastrophes in Thrace: emergence, duration, chronology, management, and mitigation of the aftermath. Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • armed conflicts – invasions, battles, uprisings
  • diplomatic rifts and discords
  • economic crises
  • natural disasters – earthquakes, floods, fires etc.
  • epidemics

Papers should not exceed 20 minutes. Posters should be of A1 size (594 x 841 mm). Authors should be aware of copyright regulations and will be responsible for bringing and presenting their printed posters. Conference languages: English, German, French. Paper proposals of up to 300 words and poster proposals of up to 200 words should be sent to romanthraceconference@gmail.com and raycheva@naim.bg. Deadline: 29 February 2020. Candidates will be notified of the committee’s decision by 31 March 2020.

No fee is required from the participants and the attendees of the conference.

The event is organized by the National Archaeological Institute with Museum – Sofia and Burgas Municipality, in partnership with Istanbul University and the Ephorates of Antiquities of Rhodope, Hebros and Xanthi.

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL BSC 2020

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 46th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held in Cleveland, Ohio, October 22–25, 2020. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies. Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (http://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/46th-annual-byzantine-studies-conference). The deadline for submission is March 2, 2020. Proposals should include: —Proposed session title —CV of session organizer —300-word session summary, which includes a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering the topic as a prearranged, whole session —Session chair and academic affiliation. Please note: Session chairs cannot present a paper in the session. —Information about the four papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 500-word abstract. Please note: Presenters must be members of BSANA in good standing. Session organizers must present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organzier is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session. Applicants will be notified by March 6, 2020. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by March 15, 2020. Instructions for submitting the panel proposal are included in the BSC Call for Papers (http://www.bsana.net/conference/BSC_2020_CFP.pdf). If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only (check issued in US dollars or wire transfer); advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement. Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

ANZAMEMS 2021

The Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies conference committee seeks proposals for its 2021 conference on the theme ‘Reception and Emotion’, to be held in Perth, Australia at The University of Western Australia from 8–12 February. The committee welcomes all approaches to topics related to ‘reception and emotion’ broadly conceived (and conceived either together or separately: i.e., on reception and emotion, or on either reception or emotion), including but not limited to: trans-cultural, trans-temporal, trans-disciplinary, translation, global studies, creative misreadings, theatrical and literary revivals, forgeries, homages, cultural counter-strikes, regimes of periodisation, etc. We welcome proposals considering the usefulness or otherwise of reception history as a methodology: is ‘transformation’ more helpful than ‘reception’, for example, for appreciating the active role of the audience of a text, play, or idea? Work on emotions can be similarly broad, covering, e.g., what’s evidenced from the ‘receivers’ and from the ‘received’ (thinking of work, for example, on how Indigenous people have received missionaries and their doctrines; how medievalists have reacted and acted in relation to the worrying associations of their discipline; even how humanities scholars feel about their reception in contemporary political circles; Jan Plamper’s suggestion that historians should keep ‘field diaries’ about their personal response to work in the archives; are there ‘objective’ studies?). What’s been the value and downside of the ‘emotional turn’ in humanities studies? How do we as scholars of the past deal with presentist notions of ‘relevance’, and need we consider past scholarship as ‘outdated? How can we marry approaches from humanities and life sciences in ‘emotions history’? The conference committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, 90-minute themed panels (of no more than 4 speakers) or workshops. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The reception of ideas about emotion in medieval/early modern texts;
  • Reception and transformation of ideologies across time and space;
  • The emotions of an audience in the reception of a play or sermon;
  • The emotional impact of a text on a reader;
  • Rituals and practices of receiving guests and dignitaries (and their emotional effects?);
  • The reception of the past: medievalism and early-modernism;
  • The reception of bodies / emotions and bodies / embodiment;
  • Reception / emotion and sexuality;
  • Reception / emotion and race;
  • Reception / emotion and gender;
  • Reception / emotion and music / art.

Submitting a Proposal Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:

  1. A title;
  2. An abstract (max. 200 words);
  3. A short biography (max. 50 words).

The conference committee welcomes themed panel or workshop session proposals for the conference. Proposals should consist of:

  1. Panel/Workshop Title;
  2. Proposed Chair (if available);
  3. Details of each presenter and paper as described above.

NB: Workshops will be allotted 90 minutes, 30 of which should be reserved for general discussion. We suggest a maximum of 6 speakers. Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) to: anzamems2021@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions: 31 July 2020. NB: Should you require early acceptance of your proposal please highlight this in your email and the committee will do our best to accommodate your request. The conference will be preceded by an ANZAMEMS seminar. An invitation for expressions of interest will follow in a separate email. For more information please see the conference website.

SHIFTING FRONTIERS XIV: SCALE AND THE STUDY OF LATE ANTIQUITY

Ohio State University in Columbus Ohio, 24-27 March 2021.

For the Fourteenth Meeting of the Society for Late Antiquity, we invite papers that investigate scale, which can be defined as a graduated range of values or measurements, whether, for example, of time, space, social organization, cosmology, or agency. Participants are encouraged to explore scale either as a methodological framework used by modern historians to interpret the past and/or as a type of late Roman analytic category, developed and employed by late ancient persons for their own heuristic purposes.

Questions papers might ask include:

To what extent does the world of Late Antiquity look different if we approach its events, institutions, and processes (whether political, economic, social, or religious) from a micro scale rather than a macro scale, and vice versa? How can we better understand the late Roman Empire through the examination of macro- and micro-scalar environmental phenomena, such as volcanic eruptions and mutating plague DNA, which were only partially (if at all) perceptible to the late Romans themselves? Alternatively, what graduated categories of measurement and values did late ancient thinkers deploy in their philosophical, scientific (including astrological), and religious works to make sense of metaphysical, ethical, or even physical quandaries? And what did scale mean to individuals on an everyday level, for agriculturalists or merchants whose livelihoods were embedded within multi-scalar economic, environmental, legal, social, and religious networks? Other papers might consider the fractal replication of structures and relationships across the Empire, for example in conciliar operations (Senate, local curia, church councils), patterns of deference across the social scale, or in the provincial extensions of imperial authority. Comparativists are encouraged to consider how problems of scale inflect transhistorical arguments that encompass both late antiquity and other periods of history.

In order to be considered for participation in this conference, please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words by September 1, 2020 to shiftingfrontiersxiv@gmail.com.

Further information about the conference can be found at https://u.osu.edu/shiftingfrontiersxiv/.

Kristina Sessa
Associate Professor of History and Director of Graduate Studies
Book Review Editor, Journal of Late Antiquity
Department of History
The Ohio State University
230 Annie and John Glenn Ave
Columbus, OH 43210

56th INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES

The 56th International Congress on Medieval Studies takes place 13-16 May 2021 at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.

SAILING WITH THE GODS: RELIGION AND MARITIME MOBILITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

Sponsored by The Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions
Location: Grand Hotel Excelsior, Floriana, Malta
Dates: June 16-20 2021

Ritual practices dedicated to maritime success appear across a wide span of human cultural history, from the Mediterranean to the North Sea, Southeast Asia across the Pacific to the west coast of the Americas. Culturally-constructed seafaring rituals could be seen as spiritual or superstitious, and respond to the combination of risk and profit endemic in even short voyages by water. Maritime religion infuses all water-borne contact across cultural boundaries; the crafts of those who build rafts, canoes, and sailing vessels; navigational skills which may reach back to ancestors who have faded into cultural legend; and myriad mnemonic and naming strategies extending to littoral markers and celestial patterns. Mythic and ritual responses are accordingly complex, ranging from apotropaia to the divine authorization of civic structures, shipboard shrines and functional epithets which could link divinities, heroes and nearly-deified rulers to the control of the waves and winds. Studies of religion and maritime mobility are often framed within individual cultural contexts, but this international conference seeks to bring together scholars from across a range of disciplines and historical periods, from prehistoric to the seventh century CE, to address critical questions in method and theory relevant to religion in the context of maritime mobility. Among these questions are:

      • What are the benefits and limitations of the types of data available for the investigation of ancient seafaring – myths, legends and histories, the excavations of harbors and shipwrecks, the iconography of sea gods, the analysis of artifacts?
      • What is the range of critical frameworks – from network analyses to iconography – appropriate for these data sets?
      • How do data from ports and land-based institutions complement or even contradict evidence from seagoing vessels?
      • How can we de-essentialize the question of ‘maritime ritual’; what might the role of cross-cultural or cross-chronological studies contribute to this end?
      • How might the studies of maritime ritual offer fresh questions for the analysis of Christianity vis-à-vis traditional Greco-Roman and Mediterranean religions?
      • How do Judaism, Christianity and/or Islam deploy maritime religion in different yet complementary ways to one another, or to polytheistic traditions such as Indian or Chinese religions?
      • How do the divine protections sought for religiously-motivated journeys such as pilgrimage compare with the day-to-day appeal to the gods on seafaring vessels?

Abstracts should be submitted by email attachment as .doc or .docx files to socamr@gmail.com and should be from 500-600 words in length for a paper to last between 25 to 30 minutes. Abstracts should contain a title and a word count, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter.  All abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously. Please direct all queries to SAMR at socamr@gmail.com. The organizers of the conference are Sandra Blakely (Emory) and Amelia Brown (UQ). To register for the conference and see schedules as they develop, please visit https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/bVv0CmOxr6srlql5TG_KBe?domain=classics.emory.edu.

BYZANTIUM: BRIDGE BETWEEN WORLDS

24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies, Istanbul, 23-28 August 2021 https://www.byzcongress2021.org/ Due to its remarkably long duration, territorial expanse, geographical situation and complex cultural traditions, Byzantium acted as a temporal and spatial bridge connecting different periods, geographical areas, and cultures.  Byzantium acted as a transition between ancient, medieval and early modern worlds around the Mediterranean basin, Eurasia and the Near East through reception, appropriation, and innovation. It connected different geographical and cultural spaces through political, economic, material, and cultural networks in many of which it constituted an important node.  Centering on the key theme of “Byzantium – Bridge between Worlds,” the 24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies aims to explore this connecting and mediatory role of Byzantium.  It also hopes to initiate proposals on bridging interdisciplinary gaps within Byzantine studies and strengthening dialogue with other relevant fields. Important Dates Conference Date: 23-28 August 2021 Announcement of the Plenary Session Participants: 15 April 2019 Announcement of the Round Tables: 15 April 2019 Announcement of the Thematic Free Communication Sessions and Participants: 15 April 2019 Call for Free Communications and Poster/VR Sessions: 15 April 2019 Period for Plenary Session Paper Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020 Period for Round Table Abstract Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020 Period for submitting Free Communication and Poster/VR Abstracts: 15 April 2019 - 15 April 2020