Forthcoming Conferences of Interest

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL, 45TH ANNUAL BYZANTINE STUDIES CONFERENCE

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held in Madison, Wisconsin, October 17–20, 2019. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website site (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/45th-annual-byzantine-studies-conference). The deadline for submission is February 10, 2019. Proposals should include:

  • Proposed session title
  • CV of session organizer
  • 300-word session summary, which includes a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering the topic as a prearranged, whole session
  • Session chair and academic affiliation. Please note: Session chairs cannot present a paper in the session.
  • Information about the four papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 500-word abstract. Please note: Presenters must be members of BSANA in good standing.

Session organizers must present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organizer is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.

Applicants will be notified by February 15, 2019. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by February 25, 2019. Instructions for submitting the panel proposal are included in the BSC Call for Papers (http://www.bsana.net/conference/2019_BSANA_CFP.pdf).

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only (check issued in US dollars or wire transfer); advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

 

7th INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM “DAYS OF JUSTINIAN I”

Special Thematic Strand for 2019: Identities
Skopje, 15-16 November, 2019

Confirmed keynote speaker: Professor Anthony Kaldellis

Organised by Institute of National History, Skopje, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje and University of Bologna, in partnership withFaculty of Theology St. Clement of Ohrid, Skopje, with the financial support of the Ministry of Culture and the City of Skopje

The International scientific symposium “Days of Justinian I” is an annual interdisciplinary scholarly forum aimed at the presentation of the latest research followed by discussions on various aspects of Byzantine and Medieval Studies before 1500; this includes the treatment and interpretation of cultural, historical and spiritual heritage in contemporary modern Europe. The Symposium is dedicated to Emperor Justinian I with the aim to bring together scholars from around the world to address a broad range of issues related to Byzantium and the European Middle Ages, comprising the exploration of the cultural and historical legacy as an integrative component of the diversities and commonalities of Unified Europe.

This year’s special thematic strand Identities aims to incite scholarly debate about the differing perceptions of identity in Byzantium and in Medieval Western Europe. Aside from the discursive evidence in the contemporary sources, modern theoretical approaches will be addressed in exploring the complex concepts and notions of identity, covering the broad range of modes of identification. Various fundamental questions will be raised in defining how identities were formed in the Middle Ages and how they were expressed, maintained, negotiated or transformed. This will encompass the ways in which Byzantium and other pre-modern states and empires have shaped and configured the composite spectrum of political, ethnic, provincial, legal, religious or cultural identities.

The symposium will embrace broader geographical areas, chronological scope, and varieties of political, ideological, cultural, social or religious contexts in exploring the multiple layers of identity in the Eastern Roman Empire and in Medieval Western Europe.

Papers are welcomed on various topics that may include, but are not limited to the following areas of discussion:

  • Romanness in the Middle Ages: Concepts and approaches
  • Being Byzantine or Roman: Interpreting the identity of Byzantium / Romania
  • Mapping ethic identities in Byzantium and in Medieval Western Europe
  • Imagining Identities in Middle Ages: Modern theoretical definitions
  • Strategies of identification
  • Concepts of the “Other” in the Middle Ages
  • Ethnicity, ethnogenesis and identity
  • Premodern ethnicity and national identity
  • Narrative, memory and identity
  • Language and linguistic identities
  • Art and identity
  • Material culture and identity
  • Roman law and legal identities
  • Gender and Identity
  • Heritage discourses and cultural identity
  • Religion, religious communities and identities
  • Heresy and Identity
  • Music and identity
  • Cultural heritage: Interpretation, restoration and protection

First Deadline for submitting an abstract of the paper: 10 August, 2019.
Second Deadline for submitting an abstract of the paper: 15 October, 2019.
Notification of acceptance for early applicants: 15 August, 2019.
Notification of acceptance for other applicants: 20 October, 2019.
Deadline for submitting the complete paper for publication: 1 March, 2020.
Please send the application form to the following address: days.justinian@gmail.com.

Presentation of the papers will be limited to 10 minutes.
Working languages: Macedonian and English.
No participation fee is required.
Travel and accommodation expenses are covered by the participants themselves.
The excursion will be covered by the organizer.
Papers delivered at the Symposium will be published in the Proceedings of the Symposium.
The papers submitted will be peer-reviewed before publication.

For further inquiries you can contact the Secretary of the Symposium, Prof. Dragan Gjalevski: days.justinian@gmail.com.

Download the call for papers.

Please check the Facebook page for news about the Symposium, the agenda, special events.

Symposiarch: Professor Mitko B. Panov

 

LATE ANTIQUE TEXTUALITIES

Society for Late Antiquity sponsored session for the Society for Classical Studies meeting January 2–5, 2020.  Organizer: Colin Whiting, American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.

We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting at cwhiting@ascsa.org. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

 

THE BYZANTINIST SOCIETY OF CYPRUS THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON BYZANTINE AND MEDIEVAL STUDIES (CBMS)

Deadline for abstracts: September 6, 2019

The Byzantinist Society of Cyprus (ΒΕΚ: Βυζαντινολογική Εταιρεία Κύπρου) invites papers to be presented at the Third International Conference on Byzantine and Medieval Studies, to be held in Nicosia, Cyprus, 17-19 January 2020.

Honorary President: Theodoros Giagkou, Professor, University of Thessaloniki
Keynote Speaker: Enrico Zanini, Professor, Università di Siena

Scholars, researchers and students are encouraged to present their ongoing research, work-in-progress or fieldwork report on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion of Cyprus and the broader Mediterranean region during the Byzantine, Medieval and Ottoman periods.

The languages of the conference will be Greek, English, French and German.

Scientific and Organizing Committee:
Nikolas Bakirtzis (Chair), Stavros Georgiou, Doria Nicolaou, Andriani Georgiou, Christina Kakkoura, Rania Michail, Thomas Costi, Ourania Perdiki, Despina Papacharalampous, Thanasis Koutoupas, Christina Roditou, Andreas Foulias.

Paper proposal submission material (see formatting details below):

Every paper proposal submission must be accompanied by an abstract between 300 and 500 words summarizing the presented research, report or work-in-progress and indicating its original contribution.

Please provide the requested information and submit your abstracts using our online application forms: Paper proposal

Sessions of up to five papers can be submitted together in the following form by the session organizer: Session proposal

Paper proposals will be reviewed based on their abstract and accepted on merit. This review will be anonymous. Notification of paper review will be send by email by the beginning of October, 2019. Papers will be grouped in sessions according to their topic and theme. Each participant may deliver only one paper limited to 20 minutes. Accepted paper abstracts will be published in the conference’s ‘Book of Abstracts’.

Graduate Paper Awards: The best graduate student papers will be selected and awarded upon the conclusion of the conference.

The conference is organized by the Byzantinist Society of Cyprus. Membership information.
For inquiries send email to cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy.

Paper proposal preparation instructions

When submitting your proposal through our online application form, you will be asked to provide the following information:

Name, position or graduate status and academic affiliation (i.e. Prof., University of…), email address, address, phone, title of paper, abstract.

If you encounter technical difficulties with our online application form, you may also send us your proposal via email (cbms2020@byzantinistsociety.org.cy) in the following format:

Prepare the paper proposal as a single Microsoft WORD document. Font: Times New Roman, 12 point. Line spacing: single.

Cover Sheet

Include the following information in the listed order. Please align text left and allow a blank line between each information detail:

Name, position or graduate status and academic affiliation (i.e. Prof., University of…), address, phone, email address, title of paper.

Abstract

Title line: No more than two lines. Do not use an all capital-letters title. Boldface and centered. Skip one line.

Author line: Author’s name followed by institutional affiliation in parentheses or, for independent scholars their city. No titles or degrees (i.e. Prof., Dr, PhD). Boldface and centered. Lower case, capitalize first letters of words. Skip two lines.

Abstract text: Justify text. No intend in the first line of paragraphs. Skip one line between paragraphs. Foreign language words transliterated and italicized. No footnotes or images. The abstract text is the sole responsibility of the author/s and will be included in the Book of Abstracts.

 

THE SPATIAL TURN IN ROMAN STUDIES

Auckland, January 22-24 2020

Durham, June 10-12 2020

Organised by Amy Russell and Maxine Lewis

https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-spatial-turn-roman-studies

We announce two international conferences plus a year-long programme of events in Durham on the theme ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies’. This is the call for papers for the Auckland conference, 22-24 January 2020. A call for papers for the Durham conference will follow.

We plan a series of events reflecting on a generation’s worth of work on the spatial turn in Roman studies and seeking out the best new scholarship arising from it.

The goal of our programme of events is a double one: first, to gain an overview of the directions research has taken, identify underlying themes and trends, and describe successful spatial methodology as a guideline for future work; second, to move beyond what has been done and explore the full potential of spatial approaches, especially by bringing together work that has taken the same body of spatial theory in different directions. The most pressing divide we see is between work on historical and archaeological space on the one hand, and imagined and literary space on the other: they represent two well-developed bodies of scholarship in Roman studies, both often drawing on the same set of 20th-century spatial theory, but not often in conversation with each other. We seek to address the questions: could more be done to bring them together and pool their insights, or does the problem lie in the way the underlying spatial theories fail to bring together real and imagined space?

The Auckland conference will include research papers, seminars with pre-circulated readings from major thinkers in spatial theory, and keynote addresses from Ray Laurence, Nandini Pandey, and Diana Spencer. This call is for those interested in delivering 20-minute research papers on any topic related to the spatial turn in Roman studies. Papers should present new research grounded in spatial methodologies; they could be historical, literary, archaeological, philosophical, or all four and more, and could cover any aspect of the Roman Mediterranean from the archaic period to late antiquity, but should reflect the impact of the spatial turn on their scholarly context. Please send a 300-word abstract as an email attachment to BOTH amy.russell@dur.ac.uk AND maxine.lewis@auckland.ac.nz by 28 June 2019, with the subject header ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies: Auckland’. We welcome proposals for innovative presentation formats, and are keen to hear from speakers of all career stages and from any discipline.

It is our ambition to pay for flights within Australasia and accommodation during the conference period for all speakers. Please note that the conference for the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will be held in Otago, New Zealand, the following week. If speakers are flying from outside Australasia to attend both our conference and ASCS, we aim to pay for your transport between Auckland and Otago.

Prospective speakers from the northern hemisphere should consider waiting to apply to the Durham conference, to reduce the total amount of air travel required. We hope to support virtual attendance for some sessions via Skype or similar, but those giving papers should plan to attend in person.

 

ASCS 41 (2020)

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will hold its 41st Annual Meeting and Conference at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, from 28-31 January 2020. We welcome abstracts on all aspects of the classical world, its reception, and traditions.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Wednesday 31st July 2019.

The abstract coversheet, instructions for submitting abstracts, and guidelines for papers and panels can be found on the ASCS website.  ​

The conference convenor is Dr Daniel Osland, with abundant support from his colleagues at Otago. Please direct enquiries related to ASCS 41 (2020) to Daniel Osland at ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz.

The 41st ASCS Annual Conference Keynote Lecture will be delivered by Cam Grey, Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

 

EXCHANGING IDEAS: TRADE, TECHNOLOGY AND CONNECTIVITY IN
PRE-ROMAN ITALY

University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand , 3-5 February 2020.

https://exchangingideas2020.wixsite.com/auck2020

Deadline for abstracts: 1 June 2019.

 

55TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES

The 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies takes place 7-10 May 2020 at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.

 

THE RECEPTION OF PLATO IN LATER ANTIQUITY AND THE MIDDLE AGES

We are delighted to announce a 2-day conference, organized by the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in collaboration with the Australian Research Council and Macquarie University, Australia

The conference will take place at the University of Athens, 8-9 June 2020.

We have collaborated with the ISNS conference organisers so to facilitate the participation of local and international delegates to both events, but please note that the two events are run independently. News about our conference can be found on https://evanagno.wixsite.com/platoreception

Our Approach:

Taking start from our common interest in the Platonic tradition and its reception in later periods, our collaboration has to date yielded one edited volume (The Neoplatonists and their Heirs, Brill, 2020, ed. Ken Parry and E. Anagnostou-Laoutides), while a second one is anticipated to host select papers from the conference. We now wish to expand our network of co-thinkers and thus, we welcome papers on any aspect of Platonic reception, both in the Byzantine East and the Latin West, in philosophical, literary and/or theological texts. Confirmed Speakers include (in alphabetical order):

-Prof Dirk Baltzly (University of Tasmania)

-Prof Kevin Corrigan (Emory University)

-Prof Lloyd Gerson (Toronto University)

-Prof Ilaria Ramelli (Durham University/ “Angelicum” University/ Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan)

Please send abstracts of circa 300 words to the conference organisers by 15 December 2019. Accepted speakers will be notified by 15th January 2020.

Our emails are: Eva.Anagnostou-Laoutides@mq.edu.au; G.Steiris@ppp.uoa.gr; garabatz@ppp.uoa.gr

We look forward to receiving your contributions,

Sincerely,

Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides (MQ) – George Steiris (UoA)– George Arabatzis (UoA)

 

SAILING WITH THE GODS: RELIGION AND MARITIME MOBILITY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD

Sponsored by: The Society for Ancient Mediterranean Religions
Location: Grand Hotel Excelsior, Floriana, Malta
Dates: June 17-21, 2020

Ritual practices dedicated to maritime success appear across a wide span of human cultural history, from the Mediterranean to the North Sea, Southeast Asia across the Pacific to the west coast of the Americas. Culturally-constructed seafaring rituals could be seen as spiritual or superstitious, and respond to the combination of risk and profit endemic in even short voyages by water. Maritime religion infuses all water-borne contact across cultural boundaries; the crafts of those who build rafts, canoes, and sailing vessels; navigational skills which may reach back to ancestors who have faded into cultural legend; and myriad mnemonic and naming strategies extending to littoral markers and celestial patterns. Mythic and ritual responses are accordingly complex, ranging from apotropaia to the divine authorization of civic structures, shipboard shrines and functional epithets which could link divinities, heroes and nearly-deified rulers to the control of the waves and winds.

Studies of religion and maritime mobility are often framed within individual cultural contexts, but this international conference seeks to bring together scholars from across a range of disciplines and historical periods, from prehistoric to the seventh century CE, to address critical questions in method and theory relevant to religion in the context of maritime mobility. Among these questions are:

      • What are the benefits and limitations of the types of data available for the investigation of ancient seafaring – myths, legends and histories, the excavations of harbors and shipwrecks, the iconography of sea gods, the analysis of artifacts?
      • What is the range of critical frameworks – from network analyses to iconography – appropriate for these data sets?
      • How do data from ports and land-based institutions complement or even contradict evidence from seagoing vessels?
      • How can we de-essentialize the question of ‘maritime ritual’; what might the role of cross-cultural or cross-chronological studies contribute to this end?
      • How might the studies of maritime ritual offer fresh questions for the analysis of Christianity vis-à-vis traditional Greco-Roman and Mediterranean religions?
      • How do Judaism, Christianity and/or Islam deploy maritime religion in different yet complementary ways to one another, or to polytheistic traditions such as Indian or Chinese religions?
      • How do the divine protections sought for religiously-motivated journeys such as pilgrimage compare with the day-to-day appeal to the gods on seafaring vessels?

Abstracts should be submitted by email attachment as .doc or .docx files to socamr@gmail.com and should be from 500-600 words in length for a paper to last between 25 to 30 minutes. Abstracts should contain a title and a word count, but should not have any information regarding the identity of the submitter.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is January 1, 2020, and all abstracts for papers will be reviewed anonymously. Please direct all queries to SAMR at socamr@gmail.com. The organizers of the conference are Sandra Blakely (Emory) and Amelia Brown (UQ). To register for the conference and see schedules as they develop, please visit https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/bVv0CmOxr6srlql5TG_KBe?domain=classics.emory.edu.

 

WRITING ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SAME-SEX DESIRE: GOALS, METHODS, CHALLENGES

June 30-July 2 2020, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

https://cms.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/events/writing-ancient-and-medieval-same-sex-desire-goals,-methods,-challenges

This call for papers is for a conference to take place June 30-July 2, 2020 at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on the topic of writing about same-sex desire in ancient and medieval societies.

Derek Krueger (UNC Greensboro), Mark Masterson (Victoria University of Wellington), Nancy Rabinowitz (Hamilton College), and Shaun Tougher (Cardiff University) will be providing  plenary addresses.

For several decades now, scholars have devoted attention to same-sex desire in both ancient times and the centuries that followed. Not surprisingly, there have been vigorous debates over how to go about it. These debates have been framed in various ways. Here are some examples:

  • essentialism VERSUS constructivism;
  • Foucauldian discourse analysis VERSUS approaches inspired by psychoanalysis;
  • (the impossibility of) objective history VERSUS (overly) subjective history;
  • perception of commonalities across time VERSUS rigorously historicizing insistence on the past’s alterity;
  • positivism VERSUS imaginative reconstruction of contemporaneous receptions.

These dichotomies, which are both reductive and don’t exhaust the possibilities, continue to crackle with contention. They also continue to undergird and even disturb current scholarly endeavours.

We are looking for papers (30 minutes in length) in which scholars not only speak about primary source material but also reflect explicitly on the theoretical orientation of their work (see the dichotomies above for examples) and the purpose(s) of (their) scholarship on same-sex desire. An additional objective of this conference will be an edited volume of papers that will aim to showcase a variety of approaches to this important topic.

Please send proposals (c. 500 words) to Mark Masterson (writingsamesexdesire@gmail.com) by 1 December 2019. If you have any questions, please send them to him at this address also.

In your proposal include
1)      the primary source material/historical milieu to be discussed, and
2)      the general theoretical basis of the work.

This conference is underwritten by the Marsden Fund/Te Pūtea Rangahau A Marsden of the Royal Society/Te Apārangi of New Zealand.

 

INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS 2020

Conference Web Site

The twenty-sixth International Medieval Congress will take place in Leeds from 6-9 July 2020.

 

MIKE CLOVER AND THE WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY

Leeds International Medieval Conference, 6-9 July 2020.

Sponsored by the Mike Clover Memorial Consortium.

Following the untimely death of Mike Clover, a much beloved and admired scholar of Late Antiquity in general and the Vandals in particular, his students, colleagues, and friends are proposing a series of conference sessions in his honor for the Leeds International Medieval Conference, 6-9 July 2020. Given Mike’s interests, the theme for next year’s conference, “Borders,” makes this initiative even more appropriate. We would welcome submissions on the kinds of topics that Mike liked to work on, things like barbarians/Vandals, prosopography, the Historia augusta, Ammianus, hagiography, coinage, and late Roman history in general.

Submissions can be sent to Ralph Mathisen, ralphwm@illinois.edu. The deadline for submissions in September 21. Subsequently, the wheels at the IMC will grind slow but fine, and the IMC states, “we anticipate being able to notify paper/session proposers whether their proposal has been accepted into the programme by the December prior to the IMC.”

 

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL AT LEEDS 2020

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 27th International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 6–9, 2020. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

The thematic strand for the 2029 IMC is “Borders.” See the IMC Call for Papers (https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/imc2020/) for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/27th-international-medieval-congress). The deadline for submission is September 3, 2019. Proposals should include:
**Title
**100-word session abstract
**Session moderator and academic affiliation
**Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
**CV

Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. Successful applicants will be notified by mid-September if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the International Medieval Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 4 session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

 

BYZANTIUM: BRIDGE BETWEEN WORLDS

24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies, Istanbul, 23-28 August 2021

https://www.byzcongress2021.org/

Due to its remarkably long duration, territorial expanse, geographical situation and complex cultural traditions, Byzantium acted as a temporal and spatial bridge connecting different periods, geographical areas, and cultures.  Byzantium acted as a transition between ancient, medieval and early modern worlds around the Mediterranean basin, Eurasia and the Near East through reception, appropriation, and innovation. It connected different geographical and cultural spaces through political, economic, material, and cultural networks in many of which it constituted an important node.  Centering on the key theme of “Byzantium – Bridge between Worlds,” the 24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies aims to explore this connecting and mediatory role of Byzantium.  It also hopes to initiate proposals on bridging interdisciplinary gaps within Byzantine studies and strengthening dialogue with other relevant fields.

Important Dates

Conference Date: 23-28 August 2021
Announcement of the Plenary Session Participants: 15 April 2019
Announcement of the Round Tables: 15 April 2019
Announcement of the Thematic Free Communication Sessions and Participants: 15 April 2019
Call for Free Communications and Poster/VR Sessions: 15 April 2019
Period for Plenary Session Paper Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020
Period for Round Table Abstract Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020
Period for submitting Free Communication and Poster/VR Abstracts: 15 April 2019 - 15 April 2020