Forthcoming Conferences of Interest


Organizer: Gavin Kelly, University of Edinburgh

Sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity

Julian ruled as sole emperor for less than 20 months between November 361 and June 363; however, his reign is among of the best attested periods of ancient history, and more of his writings survive than of any previous Roman emperor. The last pagan emperor was also the first emperor born in Constantinople, and the first to have been baptized and brought up as a Christian. His religious reversal made Julian the object of intense interest debate for contemporaries such as Libanius, Gregory Nazianzen, and Ammianus Marcellinus (recently illuminated in Gregory’s case by Susanna Elm’s Sons of Hellenism, Fathers of the Church); he continued to provoke fascination throughout the Byzantine period and for historians and writers since the renaissance, including among many others Gibbon, Ibsen, and Cavafy. Interest in his religious reaction and the vivid personality revealed in his and his contemporaries’ writings has stimulated numerous popular biographies and biographically oriented scholarly works, and to some extent overshadowed literary interest in his works (though see now Nicholas Baker Brian and Shaun Tougher (eds.), Emperor and Author),or interpretation of his actions in the broader context of fourth-century political history. His context in the religious history of the period might merit further attention in the light of contrasting recent views of the religious history of the fourth century from Alan Cameron and Peter Brown. We invite proposals for papers on Julian as politician, as author, or as thinker; on the relationship between his actions and his writing; on Julian in the context of fourth-century literature and history; and on perceptions of Julian, whether by contemporaries or by later historians and creative artists.

This panel, sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity, will form part of the 2016 meeting of the Society for Classical Studies (formerly the American Philological Association), to take place in San Francisco between 7 and 10 January 2016. One-page abstracts (ca. 400 words) for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent by email attachment to Gavin Kelly at no later than Monday, 16 February 2015. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts: Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their SCS membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. All proposals will be judged anonymously by two referees. Note that submitting an abstract represents a commitment to attend the meeting and that the Society for Late Antiquity cannot provide funding for travel.

ASCS (37) 2016

ASCS 37 (2016) is to be held at the University of Melbourne in Melbourne, Victoria, from 2-5 February 2016. The conference convener is Dr K.O. Chong-Gossard (

Full details of the call for papers are at Further details will be placed from time to time on the ASCS website (, click on the ‘News Flash’ on the home page.

All offers of papers must be received by Friday 31 July 2015. Any offers which come in after that date unfortunately will have to be rejected.

The following requirements will be in place again for this conference. Only one offer will be accepted from any one person. Those attending the conference (and offering a paper) must be ASCS members; if you are not a member and wish to join in order to attend ASCS 37, you can join by following the relevant instructions on the ASCS website (, under ‘membership’). Scholars from countries other than Australia and New Zealand will not be required to become ASCS members.

An alternative to offering a paper, particularly for postgraduate students, is a ‘poster presentation’, and we would be interested in hearing from anyone who would like to present using this format.

Members may also propose a panel of papers on a particular theme. The panel structure will need to conform to the 90 minutes allocated to each session. Applications to have a panel considered must conform to the guidelines for panels at ASCS.

We also invite archaeological reports as a specific category of presentation. We recognise that the submitted abstracts may be projections rather due to the fact that the field season will possibly take place after the call for papers has closed. Please read the guidelines for this category before submitting your proposal.

All offers of papers will be anonymously reviewed by the conference program review committee. Its task is to make decisions about the suitability (or not) of the papers offered.


Brno, Czech Republic, 3-4 March, 2016

Organizer: Ivan Foletti, Masaryk University in Brno and University of Lausanne – Centre for Cross-Disciplinary Research into Cultural Phenomena in Central European History: Image, Communication, Behaviour.

The conference aims to reflect on the ways in which collective liturgies– religious as well as civic and totalitarian – contributed to the construction of urbanism from late Antiquity to the  twentieth century and, on the other hand, how urban topography and the layout of the city influenced collective performances. The goal of such a reflection is to indicate how a collective ritual performance grows and develops in dialogue with the surrounding urban space. But especially how it participates in the determination of that same space.

The purpose of the conference is thus to explore the dialectic relationship between the city and collective rituals, beginning with Late Antique Rome, marked out by stationary liturgy, through medieval and modern cities designed to celebrate sovereigns and bishops, up to Stalinist Moscow, constructed to embrace the manifestations of Soviet power.

Participants are invited to reflect on such issues as: the methods used by the rituals to integrate the space of the cities; in what way collective performances are modified and adjusted to a specific urban situation; the manner in which urban space is reconstructed and modified to facilitate collective performances; how, with a change of regime, the new collective liturgies adapted themselves to the new situation. Papers presenting a historiographical and diachronic art historical and methodological perspective are especially welcomed.

Paper proposals of no more than one page, accompanied by a short CV, can be submitted until 10 September 2015 to:


Clermont-Ferrand, Aubusson and Limoges, 6–8 April 2016

An international colloquium entitled ‘Shared Invention: From Antiquity to the 21st Century’ will be held 6–8 April 2016, and proposals for papers are now being accepted. The colloquium is being organized by Laurence Riviale and Jean-François Luneau, lecturers at Blaise Pascal University, Clermont-Ferrand (France), in partnership with Musée national Adrien Dubouché, Limoges (France) and Cité de la Tapisserie, Aubusson (France). It will take place in Clermont-Ferrand, Aubusson and Limoges. ‘Shared invention’, or collective creation, is the chosen theme for this international colloquium, whose aim is to enable art historians working in a range of fields to understand better creation in the fine arts and production in the decorative arts.

When an artist’s work of art is translated into another medium, if the craftsman is not himself the inventor, but only a docile workman, how can differences in two items made by two craftsmen according to the same design be accounted for, but by a margin of liberty and sensitivity in which the very personality of the maker expresses itself? This margin will be at the heart of the debate, taking into account historical, social, and cultural contexts of all the periods in question.

After the Middle Ages, during which painters and sculptors belonged to a regular, legally instituted trade, those whom we now denote ‘artists’ tried to distinguish themselves by invention, leaving execution or transposition to craftsmen, and strove to elevate their trades to the dignity of liberal arts. For Giorgio Vasari, such a claim is satisfied by the expression ‘arts of design’, which were to become the ‘fine arts’, that is, painting, architecture and sculpture. ‘Design’ thereby has became the discriminating point for all academies that were subsequently founded, from the Accademia delle arti del disegno in Florence (1563) to the French Académie royale (1648), and later on, the British Royal Academy (1768). Art historians have seldom questioned this hierarchy and have more readily studied the creations of a ‘genius’, leaving the craftsman’s production in the shadow.

But is invention only the privilege of the artist who provides the design? Recent scholarly studies have striven to understand the processes of creation at the heart of workshops through artistic documentation, such as the miscellanies of modelli and inventories of human positions collected by painters in the sixteenth century, revealing the almost universal use of what has been called, paradoxically, the ‘invention copy’ – that is, the creation of a new composition achieved by putting together heterodox bits from everywhere. This type of process highlights the role of the patron, who may be the true inventor, as he owns designs and ideas and is responsible for this aspect of the composition from beginning to end. In this case, the so-called ‘artist’ is but a kind of go-between, and can only be understood as a mere workman.

Papers devoted to etchings or engravings, stone masonry, wall-painting or paper, furnishing or fashion fabrics, chinaware, stoneware, stained glass, etc., are welcome, especially if they emphasize not only the margin of liberty mentioned above, but also the aspects of works of art appropriate to their destination and intended meaning. Summaries of 2500 or 3000 characters will be submitted, along with a short CV (three lines), before 22 June 2015, to, or, or Applicants will receive a reply in September 2015.


The 51st International Congress on Medieval Studies takes place 12-15 May 2016 at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.


Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center web site ( The deadline for submission is May 24, 2015. Proposals should include:

  • Title
  • Session abstract (300 words)
  • Intellectual justification for the proposed session (300 words)
  • List of session participants (proposed list of presenters and session presider)
  • CV

Successful applicants will be notified by May 30, 2015 if their proposal has been selected for submission to the International Medieval Congress. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the Congress and will keep the potential organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and presider) up to $500 maximum for US residents and up to $1000 maximum for those coming abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

The session organizer may act as the presider or present a paper. The session organizer will be responsible for writing the Call for Papers. The CFP must be approved by the Mary Jaharis Center. Session participants will be chosen by the session organizer and the Mary Jaharis Center.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (, Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions. Further information about the International Congress on Medieval Studies is available at

About the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture

Founded in 2010 through a generous gift from the Jaharis Family Foundation, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture is dedicated to the promotion and advancement of knowledge about the rich heritage of Byzantine art and culture. The Mary Jaharis Center’s location on the Hellenic College Holy Cross campus provides a unique opportunity to foster Byzantine studies within an Orthodox Christian community. The Center sponsors a wide range of public programming and supports the study of Byzantium through grants and other resources.


‘Byzantine Studies Alive’, a conference on the importance of Byzantine Studies and Byzantine Heritage, to be held at the Radboud University Nijmegen, June 16-17 2016.

For more information and the full official call for papers with more information on the contents and a full description of aims, email Daniëlle Slootjes at

Proposals for papers are welcome on the following two themes:

1) Byzantium as a key player in the relationship between East and West, A.D. 330 -1453

Byzantium can be seen as a leading catalyst in the political, cultural, economic and religious exchange between East and West, to be detected in the relationship both between Byzantium and Latin Western Europe and Byzantium and the Islamic world.

We especially welcome the papers on this theme to include analyses on

(a) Agents of exchange such as rulers, bishops, popes, diplomats, pilgrims, writers  or artists

(b) Objects of transcultural encounter and transfer such as, (religious) monuments, texts (hagiography, historiography, liturgical texts, travel accounts)  decorations, liturgical objects, relics or diplomatic gifts.

These agents and objects can be regarded as part of the larger historical context within which Europe took shape in the Middle Ages and beyond.

2) The position of Byzantine heritage, 7th Century – present day

The definite end of the Byzantine Empire is marked by the conquest of Constantinople by the Ottomans in 1453. Through its history, however, the dimension and identity of the Empire was not one identical continuum. In different phases of development (Arab conquests, iconoclasm, Crusaders period) Byzantine monuments and artefacts were appropriated or under threat, a phenomenon that continued after the Ottoman conquest.

We especially welcome the papers on this theme to include analyses on:

(a) Appropriation and transformation of Byzantine heritage (objects, monuments, cities)

(b) Display of Byzantine heritage in Museum Collections

(c) Preservation and restoration of Byzantine heritage

(d) Byzantine heritage under threat

Abstracts, no more than 400 words, can be submitted to  and  before 1 December 2015.


University of Tasmania (Hobart), July 4-6 2016

To mark the 30th Pacific Rim Seminar, the convenors invite proposals for papers addressing the theme of ‘Roman milestones’ in Latin literature. In a literal and figurative capacity, Roman milestones feature in many genres of Latin writing, and offer suggestive frames for its interpretation. Milestones were innovative symbols of achievement and cultural reach, marking the progress of individual journeys, and signifying the broader extent (and limit) of Roman authority. As texts themselves, milestones were artefacts of Roman colonialism: their dedications advertised the Roman status of elite provincial citizens; their inscribed place-names Latinised pre-existing local identities and reoriented them within a system that endorsed Rome’s position as the centre of empire. In semiotic terms Rome’s network of milestones not only affirmed Rome’s centrality but invites an overtly linear understanding of Rome’s conception of its own space and cultural influence.

Proposed papers on ‘Roman milestones’ might address Latin literary engagement with topography, and/or with epigraphy; the subjects of colonialism, travel and tourism; the genre(s) of ‘travel writing’. More figuratively, proposed papers might address aspects of Roman literary progress, achievement, and hegemony; the extent and limits of a literary canon; the positioning of definitive texts as ‘milestones’ in terms of which other works measure their approach or distance.

Papers may be 20 minutes with ten minutes of discussion time, or 40 minutes with 20 minutes of discussion time. The Pacific Rim Seminar does not run parallel sessions, so participants can attend any or all papers.

Abstracts of 300 words (maximum) may be sent to the convenors at

Offers are welcome from graduate students and early-career researchers as well as established academics. In your abstract please specify whether you prefer a 20 or 40-minute presentation slot.

Deadline for abstracts: 29 February 2016 (earlier submissions very welcome).

Convenors: Jonathan Wallis & Emma Donnelly.


The Association Internationale des Études Byzantines (AIEB) will hold its next congress, the 23rd International Congress of Byzantine Studies, in Belgrade from 22-27 August, 2016. The members of the Serbian National Committee for Byzantine Studies, as well as all Byzantinists and medievalists of Serbia, are proud that the Belgrade school for Byzantine studies is to be entrusted again with the organization of this congress. We warmly welcome Byzantine scholars from around the world to participate and contribute to this important exchange of ideas and thereby establish the present state of research in Byzantine studies.

The upcoming congress will focus on deepening the understanding of Byzantium (the Byzantine Empire) as a living organism that lasted for more than a millenium and in which ideology, erudition, art and culture essentially contributed to the deveolpment of Europe from the Late Antique and Medieval period up to the present day. The congress will also offer young researchers the opportunity to share their ideas and projects for future research on Byzantium. Bearing all this in mind, the Réunion-Intercongrès held in Athens in September 2013 accepted the name and motto of the Congress suggested by the organizers. Both elements emphasize the above-mentioned need for understanding Byzantium as a complex organism that calls for innovative approaches to the future research.

The president of the Republic of Serbia, Tomislav Nikolić, will act as patron for the International Congress due to its importance for scientific research in Serbia and for the cultural identity of the country, for which the organizing body would like to expresses its deep gratitude. In addition, because of the scientific and cultural prominence of the International Congress, the organizers have taken further steps to secure international patronage.


The official languages of the Congress are English, French, German, Greek, Italian and Russian.

Important dates

Online registration: 1 April 2015–15 April 2016 (for participants with a communication), or 20 August (for participants without a communication).

Submission of abstracts: 1 April 2015–15 April 2016.

Final program: 1 June 2016.


A printed copy of the Congress program, containing the daily schedule of activities and other useful information will be distributed to participants upon their registration at the Congress venue. An electronic version of the program will also be available shortly before the Congress.


According to the decision taken during the closing session of the 11th International Congress of Cretan Studies (27/10/2011), the organization of the 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies was entrusted to the Society of Cretan Historical Studies which has appointed its Organizing Committee. The President and the Members of the Committee hereby address the call for the expression of interest to all wishing to participate in the 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies.

The Congress will be held in the city of Heraklion from the 22nd to the 26th of September 2016, and its proceedings will be divided into three main sections which correspond to the three long periods of Cretan history:
a) the Prehistoric and Ancient Greek period,
b) the Byzantine and Medieval period, and
c) the Modern period (up to the late 20th century).

The selected thematic axis for all three sections of the 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies shall be mobility. Those interested in participating in the Congress are thus invited to address the theme in reference to Crete and insularity in historical perspective. More specifically, the thematic of mobility addresses:
• The migration of people to, from and within Crete. Mobility therefore refers to geographic and spatial -peaceful or violent- human group mobility and the new realities it engendered.
• The flow of goods, services and practices in relation to paths, routes, journeys and the exchange of both tangible and intangible forms of culture.
• Social mobility and social and ideological transformations with reference to social change, stratification, and the configuration of the urban and rural areas. Changes in the social, institutional (civic, political and administrative), cultural and natural environment are also included, with the correlation and integration of these aspects into broader geopolitical and cultural contexts being considered preferable.

All wishing to participate in the Congress are invited to submit an abstract of 300-500 words of their proposal at the electronic platform, from the 15th of July to the 30th of November 2015.

Proposals may include either panels or paper presentations (oral or poster). For joint proposals for Workshops, please submit an overall summary of 200-400 words and abstracts of 300-500 words for each separate announcement.

The thematic axis of “mobility” is not considered obligatory in the cases of poster presentation proposals.

The abstracts submitted should list the main issues addressed, the general research framework, marking out the aspects of originality of the proposed contribution.
Only one proposal per applicant should be submitted (either individually or jointly).
The languages of the Congress will be Greek, English, French, German and Italian.
The acceptance or rejection of submitted proposals will be communicated preserving the anonymity of the scientific committee’s reviews, by the 15th of March 2016.
Each presentation should not exceed fifteen (15’) minutes plus another five (5’) minutes for discussion.

The Congress will be organized in three plenary sessions with invited speakers to be announced shortly.

The participation fee for contributors is thirty (30) Euros. Free participation will be granted to postgraduate and PhD students, and unemployed scholars.

The Proceedings of the 12th International Congress of Cretan Studies will certainly be published and at least in the form of an e-book shortly after the completion of the Congress.

For any further information, please don’t hesitate to contact the Congress Secretariat:
Society of Cretan Historical Studies – Historical Museum of Crete
Andreas & Maria Kalokerinos House
Sofokli Venizelou 27
71202 Heraklion
Crete, Greece
Tel.: +30 2810 283219 – +30 2810 288708 / Fax: +30 2810 283754


Australian Association for Byzantine Studies 19th Conference, 24-26 February 2017, Monash University, Melbourne

In the last two decades, the role of dreams, memory and the imagination in the ancient world and its cultural productions have come to receive increased attention, along with the importance of emotions in the Greco-Roman and medieval worlds. This conference will focus on the ways that the Byzantine imagination shaped its dreams and memories from the fourth to fifteenth centuries and the many ways in which these were recorded in the Byzantine world, in its historiography, literature, religion, art and architecture.

Professor Derek Krueger of Greensboro University, North Carolina, will be our guest speaker at this international conference.

We welcome papers on any aspect of the topic, including reception studies. The call for papers will be issued in July 2016. Two student bursaries will be offered to HDR students who present papers.

Further information will be available on this web site or from the Convenor, Dr Eva Anagnostou-Laoutides, at, or for general enquiries


The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies takes place 11-14 May 2017 at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.