Forthcoming Conferences of Interest

INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS 2019

Conference Web Site

The twenty-sixth International Medieval Congress will take place in Leeds from 1-4 July 2019.

ANNIVERSARIES, CELEBRATIONS AND COMMEMORATIONS IN THE ANCIENT WORLD AND THEIR RECEPTION

20th annual UNISA Classics Colloquium

We are pleased to announce the first call for papers for the annual UNISA Classics Colloquium, to be held in Pretoria from 15 to 18 August 2019.

The conference aims to explore issues marking celebrations, commemorations and anniversaries of all kinds around the ancient world (up to the 7th century CE, but including its reception in later periods).  Topics enlarging on the literary, social and political significance of such events in the building of not only civic identities but also individual legacies, as well as the appropriation of these occasions in later contexts, will be welcomed.

Paper proposals (approximately 300 words) are invited for papers of 30 minutes debating current issues and problems on any aspect of the above theme.  Abstracts and titles should include your name and university affiliation, and should be submitted to either:

Deadline for abstracts: 30 April 2019

Details of the conference venue, accommodation and other important information will be made available on the conference web site, which we hope to have up and running soon.

We look forward to hearing from you, and please do not hesitate to contact us at the addresses provided above if you have any queries.

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL, 5TH FORUM MEDIEVAL ART

The Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 5th Forum Medieval Art, Bern, 18-21 September 2019. The biannual colloquium is organized by the Deutsche Verein für Kunstwissenschaft e.V.

The theme for the 5th Forum Medieval Art is ‘Peaks, Ponti & Passages’. Bern—looking out to peaks Eiger, Mönch, and Jungfrau, situated at the border to the Romandy, and having a long-standing tradition in bridge-building—embodies certain notions of translations, entanglements, and interactions. The conference will highlight such themes, focusing on forms and means of exchange, infrastructure, political and religious relationships, and the concrete reflections of these connections through objects. Methodological challenges will also be paramount, such as questioning how to write a history of encounters between artists, artworks, materials, and traditions.

Many mountain regions, and especially the Alps, have a long history as sites of transfers and interferences. Today, mountains and glaciers are the locations revealing most rapidly the consequences of climate change. They raise our awareness of similar changes in the past. Mountain regions were and are traversed by several ecological networks, connecting cities, regions, and countries, as well as different cultures, languages, and artistic traditions. Mountains, with their difficult passages and bridges, structured the ways through which materials and people were in touch. Bridges were strategic targets in conduct of war, evidence of applied knowledge, expression of civic representation, and custom points—both blockades and gates to the world.

Peaks in the historiography of Art History mark moments of radical change within artistic developments, the pinnacles of artistic careers, and high moments in the encounters of different traditions. Since the unfinished project of Walter Benjamin, who obtained his PhD in Bern, the passage has also been introduced as a figure of thought in historiography. The passage describes historical layers as spatial constellations, in which works of art, everyday culture, religious ideas, definitions of periods and theories of history encounter.

We invite session proposals that fit within the Peaks, Ponti & Passages theme and are relevant to Byzantine studies. Additional information about the Forum Medieval Art.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website. The deadline for submission is May 30, 2018. Proposals should include:

Title
Session abstract (500 words)
Proposed list of session participants (presenters and session chair)
CV

Applicants will be notified of the status of their proposal by June 1, 2018. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session proposal to the Forum by June 8, 2018.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse will reimburse a maximum of 5 session participants (presenters and session chair) up to $300 maximum for residents of Switzerland, up to $600 maximum for EU residents, and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. In order to receive funding, session organizers and co-organizers must participate in the panel as either a participant or the session chair. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

LEGITIMACY – AEMA 14

2019 Conference of the Australian Early Medieval Association
3–5 October 2019  Monash University, Clayton, Australia

This conference invites papers on the broad theme of legitimacy.  In a modern world dominated by deeply polemical counter narratives not afraid to adjust facts to claim dominance and, thereby, legitimacy, we look at the ways in which modern forms of the pursuit of legitimacy evolved in the early Middle Ages.  Legitimacy can have several meanings, covering aspects of authenticity, legality, validity and conformity.  While it literally refers to something that meets the requirements of the law, this legal aspect is not inherent: something can be legitimate without being legal, or be legal without being legitimate.

In the context of the early medieval period, who legitimated?  What were their reasons for doing so?  Conversely, what was set aside in the process of illegitimisation?  And what do these dominant and counter narratives mean for the presentation of history?  Legitimacy implies dominant views on authority, cultural legitimacy, status and control of the means to ensure dominance, such as publication.  It can create hidden communities and counter-narratives.  Even though the early medieval period continues to exist in the popular imagination as backward and insular, in many ways it is a period marked by innovations in both the practice and pursuit of legitimacy, innovations which still resonate to this day. This conference aims to challenge the perception that the modern world is particularly modern in the way it contests legitimacy.

We invite submissions on the following topics:

  • Politics and Culture
  • Individuals and Institutions
  • Law and Justice
  • Status and Inheritance
  • Authenticity and Fraud
  • Orthodoxy and Heresy
  • Truth and Propaganda
  • Dominant and Counter Narratives
  • Objects and Spaces
  • Modern (re)interpretations of the Early Medieval

AEMA also welcomes papers concerned with all aspects of the Early Medieval period (c. 400–1150) in all cultural, geographic, religious and linguistic settings, even if they do not strictly adhere to the theme.

We especially encourage submissions from graduate students and early career researchers.  Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20-minute papers should be submitted via email to conference@aema.net.au by 5 April 2019.

Limited financial assistance is available to AEMA members on acceptance.

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL, 45TH ANNUAL BYZANTINE STUDIES CONFERENCE

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 45th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held in Madison, Wisconsin, October 17–20, 2019. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website site (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/45th-annual-byzantine-studies-conference). The deadline for submission is February 10, 2019. Proposals should include:

  • Proposed session title
  • CV of session organizer
  • 300-word session summary, which includes a summary of the overall topic, the format for the panel (such as a debate, papers followed by a discussion, or a traditional session of papers), and the reasons for covering the topic as a prearranged, whole session
  • Session chair and academic affiliation. Please note: Session chairs cannot present a paper in the session.
  • Information about the four papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 500-word abstract. Please note: Presenters must be members of BSANA in good standing.

Session organizers must present a paper in the session or chair the session. If a co-organizer is proposed for the session, the co-organizer must also give a paper in the session or chair the session.

Applicants will be notified by February 15, 2019. The organizer of the selected session is responsible for submitting the session to the BSC by February 25, 2019. Instructions for submitting the panel proposal are included in the BSC Call for Papers (http://www.bsana.net/conference/2019_BSANA_CFP.pdf).

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse session participants (presenters and chair, if the proposed chair is selected by the BSC program committee) up to $600 maximum for North American residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from abroad. Funding is through reimbursement only (check issued in US dollars or wire transfer); advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

7th INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM “DAYS OF JUSTINIAN I”

Special Thematic Strand for 2019: Identities
Skopje, 15-16 November, 2019

Confirmed keynote speaker: Professor Anthony Kaldellis

Organised by Institute of National History, Skopje, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje and University of Bologna, in partnership withFaculty of Theology St. Clement of Ohrid, Skopje, with the financial support of the Ministry of Culture and the City of Skopje

The International scientific symposium “Days of Justinian I” is an annual interdisciplinary scholarly forum aimed at the presentation of the latest research followed by discussions on various aspects of Byzantine and Medieval Studies before 1500; this includes the treatment and interpretation of cultural, historical and spiritual heritage in contemporary modern Europe. The Symposium is dedicated to Emperor Justinian I with the aim to bring together scholars from around the world to address a broad range of issues related to Byzantium and the European Middle Ages, comprising the exploration of the cultural and historical legacy as an integrative component of the diversities and commonalities of Unified Europe.

This year’s special thematic strand Identities aims to incite scholarly debate about the differing perceptions of identity in Byzantium and in Medieval Western Europe. Aside from the discursive evidence in the contemporary sources, modern theoretical approaches will be addressed in exploring the complex concepts and notions of identity, covering the broad range of modes of identification. Various fundamental questions will be raised in defining how identities were formed in the Middle Ages and how they were expressed, maintained, negotiated or transformed. This will encompass the ways in which Byzantium and other pre-modern states and empires have shaped and configured the composite spectrum of political, ethnic, provincial, legal, religious or cultural identities.

The symposium will embrace broader geographical areas, chronological scope, and varieties of political, ideological, cultural, social or religious contexts in exploring the multiple layers of identity in the Eastern Roman Empire and in Medieval Western Europe.

Papers are welcomed on various topics that may include, but are not limited to the following areas of discussion:

  • Romanness in the Middle Ages: Concepts and approaches
  • Being Byzantine or Roman: Interpreting the identity of Byzantium / Romania
  • Mapping ethic identities in Byzantium and in Medieval Western Europe
  • Imagining Identities in Middle Ages: Modern theoretical definitions
  • Strategies of identification
  • Concepts of the “Other” in the Middle Ages
  • Ethnicity, ethnogenesis and identity
  • Premodern ethnicity and national identity
  • Narrative, memory and identity
  • Language and linguistic identities
  • Art and identity
  • Material culture and identity
  • Roman law and legal identities
  • Gender and Identity
  • Heritage discourses and cultural identity
  • Religion, religious communities and identities
  • Heresy and Identity
  • Music and identity
  • Cultural heritage: Interpretation, restoration and protection

First Deadline for submitting an abstract of the paper: 10 August, 2019.
Second Deadline for submitting an abstract of the paper: 15 October, 2019.
Notification of acceptance for early applicants: 15 August, 2019.
Notification of acceptance for other applicants: 20 October, 2019.
Deadline for submitting the complete paper for publication: 1 March, 2020.
Please send the application form to the following address: days.justinian@gmail.com.

Presentation of the papers will be limited to 10 minutes.
Working languages: Macedonian and English.
No participation fee is required.
Travel and accommodation expenses are covered by the participants themselves.
The excursion will be covered by the organizer.
Papers delivered at the Symposium will be published in the Proceedings of the Symposium.
The papers submitted will be peer-reviewed before publication.

For further inquiries you can contact the Secretary of the Symposium, Prof. Dragan Gjalevski: days.justinian@gmail.com.

Download the call for papers.

Please check the Facebook page for news about the Symposium, the agenda, special events.

Symposiarch: Professor Mitko B. Panov

LATE ANTIQUE TEXTUALITIES

Society for Late Antiquity sponsored session for the Society for Classical Studies meeting January 2–5, 2020.  Organizer: Colin Whiting, American School of Classical Studies at Athens.

In Latin, textus can mean a piece of weaving. Late antiquity is well thought of as a text or a collocation of texts in which many strands are woven together— strands of the old (the Classical past, old genres, persisting aspects of material culture) and strands of the new (Christianity, new or hybridized written genres, new or hybridized elements in material culture or the built environment). At the meeting of the Society for Classical Studies in Washington, D.C., January 2–5, 2020, the Society for Late Antiquity will sponsor a session on the various textualities in late antiquity.

We are looking for papers on textuality in either written texts or material culture. Papers can consider issues of textuality in late-ancient written texts, e.g., language, intertextuality with prior written texts (pagan or Christian), or even genre. Potential panelists could also propose papers that consider textuality in material culture or the built environment, e.g., aesthetics, building styles, or methods that weave together old and new. We also encourage prospective panelists to construe the term textuality broadly and propose papers that transcend and/or question the options enumerated here.

Abstracts for papers requiring a maximum of 20 minutes to deliver should be sent no later than February 23, 2019 by email attachment to Colin Whiting at cwhiting@ascsa.org. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the SCS’s instructions for the format of individual abstracts. The submission of an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2020 meeting should the abstract be accepted. No papers will be read in absentia and the SLA is unable to provide funding for travel to Washington, D.C.

THE SPATIAL TURN IN ROMAN STUDIES

Auckland, January 22-24 2020

Durham, June 10-12 2020

Organised by Amy Russell and Maxine Lewis

https://classicalstudies.org/scs-news/cfp-spatial-turn-roman-studies

We announce two international conferences plus a year-long programme of events in Durham on the theme ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies’. This is the call for papers for the Auckland conference, 22-24 January 2020. A call for papers for the Durham conference will follow.

We plan a series of events reflecting on a generation’s worth of work on the spatial turn in Roman studies and seeking out the best new scholarship arising from it.

The goal of our programme of events is a double one: first, to gain an overview of the directions research has taken, identify underlying themes and trends, and describe successful spatial methodology as a guideline for future work; second, to move beyond what has been done and explore the full potential of spatial approaches, especially by bringing together work that has taken the same body of spatial theory in different directions. The most pressing divide we see is between work on historical and archaeological space on the one hand, and imagined and literary space on the other: they represent two well-developed bodies of scholarship in Roman studies, both often drawing on the same set of 20th-century spatial theory, but not often in conversation with each other. We seek to address the questions: could more be done to bring them together and pool their insights, or does the problem lie in the way the underlying spatial theories fail to bring together real and imagined space?

The Auckland conference will include research papers, seminars with pre-circulated readings from major thinkers in spatial theory, and keynote addresses from Ray Laurence, Nandini Pandey, and Diana Spencer. This call is for those interested in delivering 20-minute research papers on any topic related to the spatial turn in Roman studies. Papers should present new research grounded in spatial methodologies; they could be historical, literary, archaeological, philosophical, or all four and more, and could cover any aspect of the Roman Mediterranean from the archaic period to late antiquity, but should reflect the impact of the spatial turn on their scholarly context. Please send a 300-word abstract as an email attachment to BOTH amy.russell@dur.ac.uk AND maxine.lewis@auckland.ac.nz by 28 June 2019, with the subject header ‘The spatial turn in Roman studies: Auckland’. We welcome proposals for innovative presentation formats, and are keen to hear from speakers of all career stages and from any discipline.

It is our ambition to pay for flights within Australasia and accommodation during the conference period for all speakers. Please note that the conference for the Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will be held in Otago, New Zealand, the following week. If speakers are flying from outside Australasia to attend both our conference and ASCS, we aim to pay for your transport between Auckland and Otago.

Prospective speakers from the northern hemisphere should consider waiting to apply to the Durham conference, to reduce the total amount of air travel required. We hope to support virtual attendance for some sessions via Skype or similar, but those giving papers should plan to attend in person.

ASCS 41 (2020)

The Australasian Society for Classical Studies (ASCS) will hold its 41st Annual Meeting and Conference at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, from 28-31 January 2020. We welcome abstracts on all aspects of the classical world, its reception, and traditions.

The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Wednesday 31st July 2019.

The abstract coversheet, instructions for submitting abstracts, and guidelines for papers and panels can be found on the ASCS website.  ​

The conference convenor is Dr Daniel Osland, with abundant support from his colleagues at Otago. Please direct enquiries related to ASCS 41 (2020) to Daniel Osland at ASCS2020@otago.ac.nz.

The 41st ASCS Annual Conference Keynote Lecture will be delivered by Cam Grey, Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

EXCHANGING IDEAS: TRADE, TECHNOLOGY AND CONNECTIVITY IN
PRE-ROMAN ITALY

University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand , 3-5 February 2020.

https://exchangingideas2020.wixsite.com/auck2020

Deadline for abstracts: 1 June 2019.

BYZANTIUM: BRIDGE BETWEEN WORLDS

24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies, Istanbul, 23-28 August 2021

https://www.byzcongress2021.org/

Due to its remarkably long duration, territorial expanse, geographical situation and complex cultural traditions, Byzantium acted as a temporal and spatial bridge connecting different periods, geographical areas, and cultures.  Byzantium acted as a transition between ancient, medieval and early modern worlds around the Mediterranean basin, Eurasia and the Near East through reception, appropriation, and innovation. It connected different geographical and cultural spaces through political, economic, material, and cultural networks in many of which it constituted an important node.  Centering on the key theme of “Byzantium – Bridge between Worlds,” the 24th International Congress of Byzantine Studies aims to explore this connecting and mediatory role of Byzantium.  It also hopes to initiate proposals on bridging interdisciplinary gaps within Byzantine studies and strengthening dialogue with other relevant fields.

Important Dates

Conference Date: 23-28 August 2021
Announcement of the Plenary Session Participants: 15 April 2019
Announcement of the Round Tables: 15 April 2019
Announcement of the Thematic Free Communication Sessions and Participants: 15 April 2019
Call for Free Communications and Poster/VR Sessions: 15 April 2019
Period for Plenary Session Paper Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020
Period for Round Table Abstract Submission: 15 April 2019 - 15 July 2020
Period for submitting Free Communication and Poster/VR Abstracts: 15 April 2019 - 15 April 2020