Forthcoming Conferences of Interest

NEW TRAJECTORIES IN AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH ON LATE ANTIQUITY AND EARLY CHRISTIAN STUDIES

ACU Melbourne.

On 20-22 April 2022, the Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry at ACU will be running a three-day symposium titled ‘New Trajectories in Australian Research on Late Antiquity and Early Christian Studies,’ to be held in-person at ACU’s Melbourne campus. The symposium will consist of eight plenary addresses focused on recent grant funded projects in these fields, a number of short paper sessions, and a grant workshop.  The full program and registration form can be found here: https://www.acu.edu.au/research-and-enterprise/our-research-institutes/institute-for-religion-and-critical-inquiry/irci-seminars/becs-seminars/new-trajectories-in-australian-research-on-late-antiquity-and-early-christian-studies.  If you would like to attend the event (in person) please register by April 11 at that  link. For further information please contact becs.events@acu.edu.au.

 

57th INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES

The 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies takes place 9-14 May 2022 at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL, 57TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 9–14, 2022. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

PLEASE NOTE: The 57th International Congress on Medieval Studies will be virtual.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center web site (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/57th-international-congress-on-medieval-studies). The deadline for submission is May 18, 2021. Proposals should include:

**Title
**Session abstract (300 words)
**A description of the importance and/or timeliness of the proposed session (100 words)
**Proposed list of session participants (presenters and session presider)
**CV

Applicants will be contacted by May 25, 2021, regarding the status of their proposal. The Mary Jaharis Center will submit the session proposal to the Congress and will keep the organizer informed about the status of the proposal.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse up to 5 session participants (presenters and presider) for the cost of conference registration. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

HISTORIOGRAPHY AND LIFE WRITING IN THE LATE ANTIQUE WORLD

Call for Papers

Proposals for papers are sought for a hybrid conference (participation possible both in person and online) on 16-17 June 2022 exploring the writing of historiography in context of the developments in biographical literature during late antiquity.

The relationship between historiography and biography in antiquity has always been an uneasy one. Despite their mutual interest in strong characters, the writing of history and the writing of lives were regarded by ancient authors as two distinct genres. This separation proved influential too among modern scholars, but there have long existed voices suggesting that the boundaries between the two were much more blurred in practice (Momigliano 1971; Geiger 1985; Kraus 2010). Such considerations are particularly important for the later period because of the dynamic literary transformations it catalysed. The changing literary landscape from the fourth century on, in East and West, was shaped not only by the rise of new genres but also by the shift, redefinition, and even breakdown of established generic boundaries (Greatrex/Elton 2015).

Recent scholarship has shown the fruitful interrelationships with contemporary literature of both later historiography (Blaudeau/van Nuffelen 2015; van Nuffelen 2019; Conterno/Mazzola 2020) and biography (Urbano 2013, Hägg/Rousseau 2000). But the link between the two remains largely unexplored. With the emergence of new biographical sub-genres – like hagiography or heresiology – and the blossoming of old ones – such as panegyric or philosophical biography – historians could draw on a hitherto unmatched spectrum of different models when incorporating the lives and deeds of individual characters into their historical narratives. This conference aims to investigate how historians adjusted to this increasing diversity of life-writing and what impact this development had on the evolution of historiography.

We invite scholars of varied specialisms and disciplinary backgrounds interested in the history and literature of the late antique world to submit 500-word abstracts for 30-minute papers. Papers might treat, for example:

  • the factors that influenced historians’ choice of a particular model of biographical presentation over another;
  • the incorporation and adaptation of biographical source material (including translations) into historiography;
  • how historians played with their readers’ expectations by both alluding to and breaking the generic conventions of different types of biographical literature;
  • the differences in the presentation of lives across the historiographical traditions of alternative writing cultures, like Syriac or Coptic;
  • how imagined audiences determined the stylistic and compositional choices of historians narrating the life of a historical character.

We are happy to announce Peter van Nuffelen (Ghent University) and Anne Alwis (University of Kent) as confirmed keynote speakers of the conference.

Applications from all scholars, including postgraduate students, are welcome. Abstracts of 500 words should be sent to karl.dahm@kcl.ac.uk by 5.00pm on 14 January 2022.

ANZAMEMS 2022

The Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies conference committee seeks proposals for its 2021 conference on the theme ‘Reception and Emotion’, to be held in Perth, Australia at The University of Western Australia on 27 June-1 July 2022.  The conference will be held online.

The committee welcomes all approaches to topics related to ‘reception and emotion’ broadly conceived (and conceived either together or separately: i.e., on reception and emotion, or on either reception or emotion), including but not limited to: trans-cultural, trans-temporal, trans-disciplinary, translation, global studies, creative misreadings, theatrical and literary revivals, forgeries, homages, cultural counter-strikes, regimes of periodisation, etc. We welcome proposals considering the usefulness or otherwise of reception history as a methodology: is ‘transformation’ more helpful than ‘reception’, for example, for appreciating the active role of the audience of a text, play, or idea?

Work on emotions can be similarly broad, covering, e.g., what’s evidenced from the ‘receivers’ and from the ‘received’ (thinking of work, for example, on how Indigenous people have received missionaries and their doctrines; how medievalists have reacted and acted in relation to the worrying associations of their discipline; even how humanities scholars feel about their reception in contemporary political circles; Jan Plamper’s suggestion that historians should keep ‘field diaries’ about their personal response to work in the archives; are there ‘objective’ studies?). What’s been the value and downside of the ‘emotional turn’ in humanities studies? How do we as scholars of the past deal with presentist notions of ‘relevance’, and need we consider past scholarship as ‘outdated? How can we marry approaches from humanities and life sciences in ‘emotions history’?

The conference committee invites proposals for 20-minute papers, 90-minute themed panels (of no more than 4 speakers) or workshops. Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • The reception of ideas about emotion in medieval/early modern texts;
  • Reception and transformation of ideologies across time and space;
  • The emotions of an audience in the reception of a play or sermon;
  • The emotional impact of a text on a reader;
  • Rituals and practices of receiving guests and dignitaries (and their emotional effects?);
  • The reception of the past: medievalism and early-modernism;
  • The reception of bodies / emotions and bodies / embodiment;
  • Reception / emotion and sexuality;
  • Reception / emotion and race;
  • Reception / emotion and gender;
  • Reception / emotion and music / art.

Submitting a Proposal

Proposals for 20-minute conference papers should consist of:

  1. A title;
  2. An abstract (max. 200 words);
  3. A short biography (max. 50 words).

The conference committee welcomes themed panel or workshop session proposals for the conference. Proposals should consist of:

  1. Panel/Workshop Title;
  2. Proposed Chair (if available);
  3. Details of each presenter and paper as described above.

NB: Workshops will be allotted 90 minutes, 30 of which should be reserved for general discussion. We suggest a maximum of 6 speakers.

Submissions should be emailed (as a Word document attachment) by 18  February 2022 to: anzamems2021@gmail.com.

NB: Should you require early acceptance of your proposal please highlight this in your email and the committee will do our best to accommodate your request.

The conference will be preceded by an ANZAMEMS seminar. An invitation for expressions of interest will follow in a separate email.

For more information please see the conference website.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

Further information about the International Congress on Medieval Studies is available at https://wmich.edu/medievalcongress.

LEEDS INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONFERENCE

University of Leeds, 4-7 July 2022

Conference website.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome, while every year the IMC also chooses a special thematic focus. In 2022 this is ‘Borders’.

Medieval borders have preoccupied scholars for several decades in various guises. The term ‘border’ designates a wide variety of phenomena: physical geographical limits, that can be signalled by border markers or natural features, points where toll has to be paid, political boundaries, that vary from points in space to linear and fortified military fronts, ways of controlling space, frontier zones, borderlands, porous zones of encounters and contact, ways of limiting community and identity, ideological and metaphorical delimitation including discourse and representation, bordering practices, the process of creating and performing borders, and borderscapes to capture fluidity and change over time.

Paper proposal deadline: 31 August 2021

Session proposal deadline: 30 September 2021

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL, 2022 INTERNATIONAL MEDIEVAL CONGRESS

To encourage the integration of Byzantine studies within the scholarly community and medieval studies in particular, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 2022 International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, 4-7 July 2022. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

The thematic strand for the 2022 IMC is “Borders.” See the IMC Call for Papers (https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/imc-2022/) for additional information about the theme and suggested areas of discussion.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center website (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/imc-2022). The deadline for submission is 3 September 2021. Proposals should include:

*Title
*100-word session abstract
*Session moderator and academic affiliation
*Information about the three papers to be presented in the session. For each paper: name of presenter and academic affiliation, proposed paper title, and 100-word abstract
*CV

Applicants will be contacted by mid-September about the status of their proposal.

The session organizer may act as the moderator or present a paper. Participants may only present papers in one session.

If the proposed session is approved, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 4 session participants (presenters and moderator) up to $600 maximum for European residents and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside Europe. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement.

Please note that all listed speakers and the moderator should be prepared to participate remotely should health conditions necessitate a virtual conference or should local conditions make travel inadvisable for a participant. In the case of remote participation, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse participants for conference registration.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

24TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF BYZANTINE STUDIES

https://byzcongress2022.org

Venice and Padua, 22-27 August 2022

We welcome submissions from National Committees of the AIEB, Commissions of the AIEB, universities, scholarly and research institutions, museums, libraries, galleries, as well as individual scholars at any stages of their careers as well as members of the general public interested in scholarly research on Byzantium and its heritage.

MARY JAHARIS CENTER SPONSORED PANEL, 48TH ANNUAL BYZANTINE STUDIES CONFERENCE

As part of its ongoing commitment to Byzantine studies, the Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture seeks proposals for a Mary Jaharis Center sponsored session at the 48th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference to be held at the University of California, Los Angeles, 3-6 November 2022. We invite session proposals on any topic relevant to Byzantine studies.

Session proposals must be submitted through the Mary Jaharis Center web site (https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/48th-bsc). The deadline for submission is 22 April 2022.

If the proposed session is accepted, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse a maximum of 5 session participants (presenters and chair) up to $600 maximum for scholars based in North America and up to $1200 maximum for those coming from outside North America. Funding is through reimbursement only; advance funding cannot be provided. Eligible expenses include conference registration, transportation, and food and lodging. Receipts are required for reimbursement. For scholars participating remotely, the Mary Jaharis Center will reimburse participants for conference registration.

For further details and submission instructions, please visit https://maryjahariscenter.org/sponsored-sessions/48th-bsc.

Please contact Brandie Ratliff (mjcbac@hchc.edu), Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture with any questions.

SLOW AND FAST VIOLENCE IN LATE ANTIQUITY

Society of Classical Studies 154th Annual Meeting, 5-8 January 2023, New Orleans

Call for Papers for Panel Sponsored by the Society for Late Antiquity: Slow and Fast Violence in Late Antiquity

Organized by Henry Gruber, Department of History, Harvard University

We invite papers that address violence — of all types — in the long Late Antiquity.

The period now known as Late Antiquity was originally defined by catastrophic military violence: Hordes of barbarians poured across the Roman frontiers, burning fields, plundering cities, and leaving destruction in their wake. In recent decades, catastrophist views of the period 250-750 CE have receded in scholarly discourses, replaced by a narrative that foregrounds transformation, accomodation, and cultural intermingling. While there have been some notable and controversial attempts (Ward-Perkins, The Fall of Rome, 2005) to recenter military violence as a primary — and destructive — historical agent in Late Antiquity, for the most part this latter approach seems to dominate.

Although military violence has receded from the foreground of late antique studies, violence has not. Rather, broader and more nuanced understandings of violence shape our understanding of the period (Drake, ed., Violence in Late Antiquity, 2016). Major recent works have focused on religious violence within and between faith communities (Gaddis, There is No Crime for Those Who Have Christ, 2005; Sizgorich, Violence and Belief in Late Antiquity, 2009; Shaw, Sacred Violence, 2011; Kalleres, City of Demons, 2015); violence as a source of and form of social control (Cooper and Wood, Social Control in Late Antiquity, 2020), and the related violence of enslavement (Harper, Slavery in the Late Roman World, 2011; Rio, Slavery After Rome, 2017).

Many of these new types of violence can be understood to exemplify Slow Violence, a concept pioneered by Humanities and the Environment scholar Rob Nixon (Slow Violence, 2011) to encompass the ways in which violence—especially against the poor—can occur in ways that are not as immediately visible as the fast violence of military conflict. This slow violence, which feminist critics (Christian and Dowler, “Slow and Fast Violence: A Feminist Critique,” 2019) have also pointed out is often gendered feminine, shapes and structures contemporary society through pollution, workplace exploitation, and other long tendrils of the global supply chain. We hope to show how interrogating slow violence, as opposed to violence as necessarily fast and presumably military, reopens the question of the violence in Late Antiquity by expanding its definition to include the everyday violence of social domination in the city and the countryside.

In this session, we will ask about types of violence — fast and slow — in Late Antiquity. We welcome papers on religious violence, spiritual violence, and visions of violence; fast military violence like battles, sacks, and sieges, as well as the slow violence of recruitment, requisition, and taxation; enslavement and slavery; sexual violence and sexual labor, inside and outside of enslavement; judicial violence such as prisons and the slow violence of the Roman penal state; the mines; the gladiators; gender based violences; and the often-hidden role of women as both victims and purveyors of violence, which include domination and enslavement in the domestic sphere, sexual exploitation, and the violence inherent in Late Antique high politics.

Papers may last no longer than twenty minutes, and will be followed by five minutes for discussion. The session will conclude with an extended period of discussion between panelists and audience members. Please send questions and abstracts of no longer than 500 words by email to Henry Gruber (Harvard University) at hgruber@g.harvard.edu by the extended deadline of 15 February 2022. Abstracts should be sent as an email attachment; please make sure they are anonymous. All submissions will be judged anonymously by two referees. Prospective panelists must be members in good standing of the SCS at the time of submission and must include their membership number in the cover letter accompanying their abstract. Please follow the guidelines for individual abstracts (see the SCS Guidelines for Authors of Abstracts). Acceptance decisions will be communicated to the authors of abstracts by April 1, 2022, with enough time that those whose abstracts are not chosen can participate in the individual abstract submission process for the upcoming SCS meeting.

Submitting an abstract represents a commitment to attend the 2023 meeting if the paper is accepted. No papers will be read in absentia, and the Society for Late Antiquity is unable to provide funding for travel to New Orleans.